The rescue of seven dolphins stranded on Cape Cod at low tide went smoothly as planned

The International Fund for Animal Welfare, volunteers, AmeriCorps members and the National Park Authority helped move the dolphins to deeper water near Provincetown, Massachusetts.

All seven dolphins returned to swimming safely, thanks to the community acting quickly to rescue them.

According to the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), some residents saw several stranded dolphins near Wellfleet, Massachusetts and immediately called the IFAW hotline.

The first dolphin images taken by IFAW volunteers arrived at 7am local time and show at least three dolphins trapped in the Herring River.

According to the IFAW, the area is notorious for mass strandings due to wild tidal fluctuations along the coast, docked near Cape Cod Bay and Welfleet.

IFAW rescue teams arrived at the scene just before 8 a.m. and found seven Atlantic white dolphins stranded at low tide.

In addition to IFAW rescuers, volunteers, AmeriCorps and members of the National Park Authority also participated in the marine mammal rescue.
“The first course of action upon our arrival was to find the best way to reach the dolphins and move our equipment to hard-to-reach places,” said Misty Niemeyer, animal rescue manager at IFAW.
“The first course of action upon our arrival was to find the best way to reach the dolphins and move our equipment to hard-to-reach places,” said Misty Niemeyer, animal rescue manager at IFAW.

The team, according to a notice. “The dolphins looked fine, but it must have been sunny and warm that day, so I was in a hurry.”
“Our team has been working on increasing the difficulty of the rising water, but we have found that allowing dolphins into this area is not an option, as it is often caught in a cycle of tides and tides. I know,” added Ginocchio Meyer.

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